By   09/12/2017

Event Details

  • Date:
  • Categories:

Tuesday, 9/19/2017
  • 2:00 PM (Eastern)
  • 1:00 PM (Central)
  • 12:00 PM (Mountain)
  • 11:00 AM (Pacific)

In the age of media mentorship, how do children’s librarians and educators know which new media to share with families? In this two part webinar series, four experts, including librarians and educators, will offer tips and strategies for identifying high quality new media (for ages 14 and under) that supports learning, literacy, inclusion, and family engagement.

Part 1:
New Media, Media Literacy, and Media Mentorship in the Library
The Right Media for the Job: Considering the How, When, Where and Why
Inclusion & Diversity in New Media: KIDMAP Toolkit and Evaluation Checklist

Learning Outcomes

1. Participants will understand what media mentorship means.
2. Participants will learn how to evaluate a variety of technology tools with which children can explore and create, including cutting-edge diversity criteria.
3. Participants will gain strategies for choosing high quality new media that they can share with families in discussions about media literacy.
4. Participants will become more knowledgeable about the latest trends in new media.

Who Should Attend

Children’s librarians, school librarians, educators

Instructors

Claudia Haines leads storytimes, hosts Maker programs, and gets great media into the hands of kids and teens as the Youth Services Librarian and media mentor at the Homer Public Library (Alaska). She is a co-author of the ALSC white paper, Media Mentorship in Libraries Serving Youth and Becoming a Media Mentor: A Guide for Working with Children and Families. She trains other librarians as media mentors and serves on both local and national committees that support families and literacy, including the 2018 Caldecott Award Committee. She is a new media reviewer for Beanstack and Children’s Technology Review. She blogs at www.nevershushed.com.
J. Elizabeth Mills is a PhD Candidate and the Beverly Cleary Research Assistant at the University of Washington Information School. She studies how public library children’s programs can be culturally positive spaces. She was a researcher on the award-winning Project VIEWS2 study, measuring early literacy outcomes in library storytimes. She is a co-author of Supercharged Storytimes: An Early Literacy Planning and Assessment Guide and has written many books for children. She is also social media manager for the grassroots organization, Kids’ Inclusive & Diverse Media Action Project (joinkidmap.org).

Registration

Cost

ALSC and The Erikson Institute are partnering to offer this webinar free of charge.

How to Register

This webinar will be hosted on The Erikson Institute’s platform. To register, please visit their website here.

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